Fast Roads, Slow Deaths

Fast Roads, Slow Deaths

Just a few kilometers off the South Australian mainland, Kangaroo Island is celebrated as one of Australia’s top wildlife destinations. Conservation areas and national parks cover around one third of the island, and more than 190,000 people come to visit every year.

Tragically, the animals on the island pay a high price for the popularity and beauty of their home.

A countless number of kangaroos and other animals are killed, fatally injured or maimed by vehicle impact every year — But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Many of the major roads on the island have inflexible ...

Just a few kilometers off the South Australian mainland, Kangaroo Island is celebrated as one of Australia’s top wildlife destinations. Conservation areas and national parks cover around one third of the island, and more than 190,000 people come to visit every year.

Tragically, the animals on the island pay a high price for the popularity and beauty of their home.

A countless number of kangaroos and other animals are killed, fatally injured or maimed by vehicle impact every year — But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Many of the major roads on the island have inflexible speed limits of over 100km/h, some up to 110km/h. These limits don’t change between dusk and dawn, even though this is when the risk of hitting wild animals increases dramatically. 

Reducing the speed limit between dusk and dawn is a simple, immediate and sensible solution with the potential to cut the injury and trauma suffered by Kangaroo Island’s wildlife. It has already been used in other places around Australia to protect animals (and people) after dark. 

Some people may think of ‘road kill’ as just a fact of life … but the body count that lines the roads doesn’t tell the full horror story. When an animal is struck by a car, their death is often slow and traumatic. Some estimates suggest that over 50% of all ‘road kills’ are not killed immediately, but go on to die slowly and painfully. 

The trauma is also not restricted to wildlife. The drivers and passengers in vehicles that hit these animals can be injured, and those that witness an impact, discover injured and dying animals or care for them, can also suffer. Sandy’s story in the video above is testament to this. 

Please join the call to introduce dusk-to-dawn speed reductions. These should especially be introduced on major roads where speeds are set at over 100km/h.

The people with the power to change this need to hear from you —  tell them to take this simple step to reduce the terrible wildlife trauma and injury.

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A traumatic problem with a simple solution, send your message now!

South Australian Minister of Road Safety, Peter Malinauskas; the Minister of Sustainability, Environment and Conservation, Ian Hunter; Local Member for Finniss, Michael Pengilly; Regional Director Natural Reources Kangaroo Island; Kangaroo Island Natural Resource Management Board and the Kangaroo Island Council are all in a position to work together and help reduce the rate of wildlife road trauma that occurs on Kangaroo Island, but they need to hear from YOU!

 

Tell ...

South Australian Minister of Road Safety, Peter Malinauskas; the Minister of Sustainability, Environment and Conservation, Ian Hunter; Local Member for Finniss, Michael Pengilly; Regional Director Natural Reources Kangaroo Island; Kangaroo Island Natural Resource Management Board and the Kangaroo Island Council are all in a position to work together and help reduce the rate of wildlife road trauma that occurs on Kangaroo Island, but they need to hear from YOU!

 

Tell them it's time to make a significant difference and implement dusk-to-dawn speed limit reductions on Kangaroo Island, especially where speeds limits are set at an inflexible 110km/h.

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